Imperialism in shooting an elephant

The author draws a connection between the British Empire and the elephant using two main aspects; physical traits and its effects on the country of Burma. He loads the gun, lies on the road, and takes aim at the elephant.

No matter how he does not like it, he still has to do it.

British Imperialism in Burma: Shooting an Elephant

Once again, the Burmese appear to wield power over Orwell, subverting the colonial hierarchy. The author lost his control at that moment similarly to the European lost the control on its colonies.

What is George Orwell's view on imperialism as revealed in the essay

All sorts of middlemen, brokers, millers, exporters, have made colossal fortunes from rice without the producer-that is the peasant-getting a thing out of it. The natives not only had the expectation that he would shoot but would encourage it to take advantage of it.

What would really be helpful would be something in the article itself to clarify the status of this essay -- as autobiographicalsemi-autobiographical or wholly fictional. Peter Davisonthe editor of Orwell's Complete Works, includes an interview with George Stuart, a contemporary of Orwell in Burma, who said that Orwell was transferred to Kathar as punishment for shooting an elephant.

For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the "natives," and so in every crisis he has got to do what the "natives" expect of him. The narrator describes the way he feels toward the natives and how the natives respond toward the European throughout his retelling of experiences.

How does

It was administered as a province of India untilwhen it became a separate, self-governing colony, attaining its independence on January 4, Orwell perceives that whether he shoots that elephant or not, he cannot change the thought of the natives about him, a European officer.

To create a parallel between the elephant and the empire, the author describes the result of the elephant is wild and terrorizing. A sahib has got to act like a sahib; he has got to appear resolute, to know his own mind and do definite things. The essay finishes with him wondering if they will even understand his motive for having killed the elephant as he merely wished to salvage his pride.

Shooting an Elephant

That is not the question; let us simply say that British control is despotic and, to put it plainly, self-interested. I had committed myself to doing it when I sent for the rifle. From the outset, Orwell establishes that the power dynamics in colonial Burma are far from black-and-white.

He said he did. Unfortunately, his desire not to be laughed at trumps his other motivations—in fact, he is more afraid of humiliation—and perhaps of the way that humiliation might impact the local's sense of him as an authority figure—than he is of physical harm.

Active Themes The crowd reaches the rice paddies, and Orwell spots the elephant standing next to the road. Until the end, the young European men when knew that the author had shot the elephant, he was mad about it. Thanks-- Skittles the hog talk. The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant” Words 5 Pages In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not.

George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism - George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism The glorious days of the imperial giants have passed, marking the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism.

"Shooting an Elephant" is an essay by English writer George Orwell, first published in the literary magazine New Writing in late and broadcast by the BBC Home Service on 12 October George Orwell: Modernism and Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant" Maggie Hines 11th Grade “Shooting an Elephant,” a short story by George Orwell, is about a man who goes against his morals and succumbs to social pressures at.

In George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant,” deals with the evil side of imperialism. The shooting of the elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and the British officer.

The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant” Words 5 Pages In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not.

Imperialism in shooting an elephant
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How does "Shooting an Elephant" relate to imperialism? | eNotes